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Burns Unbroke - Reinventing the Bard for the 21st Century

Summerhall, Edinburgh, January 25th-March 10th
If Robert Burns was an early sighting of a working class auto-didact, it befits a multi-media arts festival to reimagine Burns’ questing poetic spirit for the twenty-first century. This is the aim of the Summerhall-hosted Burns Unbroke festival, which over its six-week duration will feature an array of music, performance and visual art inspired by the bard.
The visual art strand includes work by more than thirty artists spread out over eleven gallery spaces. This includes pieces by Graham Fagen, Bridget Collins, Douglas Gordon and the Chapman Brothers, as well as former Frankie Goes to Hollywood vocalist, Holly Johnson. Four new commissions will also feature; a mural by Ciara Veronica Dunne, a film-based installation by Ross Fleming, a mixed media piece by Derrick Guild, and a map by Robert Powell that pinpoints all the places in Edinburgh relevant to Burns.
Presented in a collaboration between Summerhall and the Artruist organisation, the …
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CCA, Glasgow Four stars

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Nicola McCartney, Sunniva Ramsay and the Traverse Theatre - Class Act Mumbai

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Trying for a Sculpture - Bruce McLean, Natalie Doyle, Abi Lewis, David Bellingham

Lust and the Apple, Temple, near Gorebridge until February 15th
Four stars

Bruce McLean may have been absent from the opening of this group show named after one of his wry works, but his playful spirit permeated throughout Lust and the Apple's former school-house. Outside, the soundtrack to two of McLean's three films on show could be heard, bleeding through the walls like an end of term disco. En route, you needed to navigate Tentilla, a drive-way construction and one of a menagerie of imagined creatures by Abi Lewis. Also on show are an array of heads on sticks in the garden called Critters, a pair of mop-headed dogs on wheels and a snake-lined altar.
Beaming down from the outside wall is THIS COLOUR IN THE PLACE OF ANOTHER, the first of a proposed series of four neon pieces by David Bellingham. Indoors, another text-based work, THINGS ARE NOT LIKE OTHER THINGS THEY JUST ARE OTHER THINGS (BLACKBOARD) is an equally gnomic lesson. In the bath-room, Natalie Doyle's performa…